Trash into [fabulous] textile greeting cards

Anna VanDelman writes:
On a beautiful, cold, clear evening, Temple Sinai was ABUZZ  with the excitement of creating 4″ x 6″ pieces of fabric into gift/greeting cards.

Rikki Blitt introduced our own TallitMaaven and fabric design diva, Marilyn Cohen Levy, who presented power point slides showing her amazing work on cards, postcards that yes, go through the mail, and a variety of her other amazing projects. And, who knew what you can do with dryer lint!

A plethora of ideas flowed through the evening. Marilyn generously shared an incredible amount of her stash so that we all took home several cards. This is pure mitzvah work allowing Marilyn to reduce her own stash and of course purchase more fabric. And I, for one, will never have to purchase another greeting/gift card. How lucky we are as members of this Guild to count such talent within our core.

Reesa Wasser flew in from Florida baggage and all to thank Marilyn for all her work and for sharing her special talent with us. Certainly a night to remember!

 

An evening of Bling! Bling! Bling! Turning Trash into Treasures

Anna VanDelman writes:

On this winter night, two dozen Pomegranate members came together with the warmth of camaraderie for an evening workshop, turning trash into treasures.

Paula Miller – teacher, exquisite fabric artist, designer, inventive recycler – presented instructions for the transformation of junk into brooches using discarded beads, threads, paint, fabric charms etc. Members brought their own stash items and The Guild brought out enormous quantities of resource materials.

Thanks to Paula’s display of items she brought and created for this project, we were inspired to create our own new treasures. This programme reminded us of how important it is for us to work on various projects in an atmosphere of friendship and shared ideas.

Thank you Paula for a memorable evening!

 

We got hooked!

Janis Katz writes

“GET HOOKED” – it’s not what you think!
Continuing this year’s theme of “Do Not Waste”, Guild members and guests spent the evening learning about, and practicing, the art of “hooking” (or sometimes “prodding”). This event was co-presented and hosted by Congregation Darchei Noam. Evening Bag

Our Guild secretary, Barbara Goldstein [see more about Barbara below], gave us a primer on (rug) hooking: she showed us stunning samples of her own work (bags, chair pads, cholent trivets) and then demonstrated how it’s done. The supplies are few: latch hook canvas, a crochet hook (or chopstick), and a darning needle. Then there’s the fabric: everyone grabbed their favourite from the Guild stash – chiffon, velvet, cotton, wool, etc. – and started tearing or cutting thin strips about 1 cm wide.

With this technique, you start on the edge first. Fold back one row of the canvas and whipstitch or overcast using a darning needle threaded with a fabric strip. Then you use your crochet hook or chopstick to fill in the grid. “Hooking” uses a crochet hook to pull up fabric loops in each grid square. “Prodding” is done with a chopstick, to push loops down in the grid. The loopy side is the right side.

Everyone had a great time tearing strips of fabric, hooking and prodding, and chatting.

A tip from Barbara: you could “get hooked” on this technique and be tempted to go out and buy fabric, but remember – do not waste, use your stash!

The Guild was delighted to be able to partner with Congregation Darchei Noam for this event, and we’ll be partnering again in March and May of 2016.

 A note about Barbara: Barbara is a graduate of Sheridan College and Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Textile Studios, as well as an active member of The Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto. She has exhibited in many art shows, most recently “The Edge of the Forest”, now traveling across Canada. All completed work shown in this post are Barbara’s.

Show share and quell – eye candy!

Anna Vandelman reports: On June 17th members of the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto came together for the culmination of the year, our closing meeting featuring the work of our hands. What a treat for all who attended! Here is some eye candy for you.

Select any picture to start a slide show and see artists and titles, or refresh your page to rearrange the images.

The Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto wishes everyone a productive summer of stitching, knitting, felting, beading, embroidering, quilting, weaving…..

Make in the summer and show in the winter – call for entry for Judaic Art and Jewelry Fair

Marilyn Levy shares the following proposal call

Screen Shot 2015-07-02 at 11.51.59 AM

Shalom,
We are delighted to invite you to submit your art for our jury.  Moriah Congregation’s Biennial All-Judaic Art & Jewelry Fair will be held Saturday night, Motzei Shabbat, 

February 27, Sunday, February 28 and Monday, February 29, 2016, with Patron Preview on Thursday, February 25, 2016.  Our exhibitors are nationally and internationally acclaimed artisans; from Judaic artists working in diverse media to creators of inspiring jewelry.  And, once again, we are welcoming clothing and purse designers!

Moriah Congregation is a vibrant, Conservative synagogue with an involved community located in Chicago’s affluent North Shore.  Our shows have been extremely profitable for both Moriah and the participating artists. Our last show welcomed over 2,000 customers and had more than 800 individual sales.

Feedback from our artists who have participated in previous fairs has been very positive; friendly home hospitality, an inviting Jewish community and the feeling of being warmly welcomed are typical comments. In addition, the Fair provides a wonderful opportunity to establish new contacts with Chicago Judaic retailers and gift shops. Extensive advertising and promotion will be done throughout the Chicagoland community for this show.

Please note the following:

  • All artists are required to be present to sell only their creations.
  • There is no charge to exhibit.
  • Moriah receives 20% of each artist’s gross sales. 
  • Kosher meals are provided for all of our artists from set-up to tear-down at Moriah. 
  • Out-of-town artists are provided with home hospitality from Wednesday, February 24 –  Tuesday, March 1, 2016. 

For more information and entry form click here: http://www.moriahcong.org/ArtFair

Torah Stitch by Stitch Celebrates its Second Anniversary!

Temma Gentles reminds us that it’s time for a celebration! Torah Stitch by Stitch achieves its 2nd anniversary with “awesome engagement, new scans & illuminations.” For more details see Engagement and Amazement. And help continue the project.

2nd anniversary, new panels, stitcher engagement

Celebrate: Critiques and Book Construction

Karen Sanders reports: On Wednesday May 20, our Artist-in-Residence Laya Crust gave the final session of her year-long theme of Celebration. Initially she spoke about the concept of a critique. A critique is not a criticism. It is an analysis of what you can do to make your work better. The person giving the critique should be objective, starting and ending with something positive, sensitive about not destroying the ego of the person whose work is being critiqued. Next Laya spoke about book construction, giving examples of fabric books, then of folded paper books. She supplied paper, glue, scissors, and ribbon so that we could make accordion fold books. Her directions are included here. Thank you, Laya, for a year of celebrating ourselves, our work, and our textiles!

Meetings March and April

Anna Vandelman reports:

Meeting March 18th, 2015
Our Artist in Residence, Laya Crust, took us through an extensive review of Passover just as we entered the last few weeks of making our own Pesach.

She shared the artistic history of the Haggadah with a table full of beautiful examples. She showed us how the art in each Haggadah revealed local customs as well as social and political issues through elements such as clothing, furniture, buildings, symbols, and artistic style. The first printed map of Israel occurs in a Haggadah of 1526, the first etching of the Four Sons in a Haggadah of 1695, and the political aspirations of the Jewish Brigade are expressed in its Haggadah of 1943. And, we see how marketing gimmicks promote the use of particular Haggadot: Once coffee was available kosher for Passover, Maxwell House capitalized on that by providing a Haggadah with the purchase of a jar of coffee. We can see in the variety of Haggadot that its themes are continually reinterpreted, in text, but especially in art.

Members then examined Passover artifacts brought in by other Guild members. And we all started working on a hands-on activity of designing a Passover apron: to wear for getting the kitchen clean, making the chicken soup or gefilte fish, or engaging younger members in the family in the process. Thank you Leah for an exciting programme.

Meeting April 15th 2015
Our April meeting was an exciting co-presentation by the Pomegranate Guild and Darchei Noam synagogue, at Darchei Noam. The lecture and exhibit of her art by Dr. Myriam Nafte blew us all away!

Myriam Nafte discussing her work

Myriam Nafte discussing her work

Sara Petroff, Chair of the Art Committee at Darchei Noam welcomed us all and introduced Pomegranate Guild president Karen Chisvin. As this evening was the eve of Yom HaShoah, Karen commemorated the event with remarks that honoured the martyrs, survivors and resistance fighters, the Hagvurah and then introduced the artist/speaker Dr. Myriam Nafte.

Dr. Myriam Nafte is a woman for all seasons, involved in medicine, anthropology, mathematics, mysticism, forensics, science and Judaica (and, oh yes, art). She began as a textile artist doing aleph bet paintings on silk: a tapestry of Jewish thought, words of wisdom, words of praise. She uses text as powerful imagery. After many years of examining anatomical and other scientific texts for their drawings, Myriam spent a period of time learning Hebrew calligraphy from her sofer/artist father. This brought her back to those same scientific texts with the discovery that Hebrew was a significant scientific language, not just a language of ritual and religion. In the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the early Enlightenment, Jews were involved in science, math, and cosmography. They invented navigational instruments, and other tools and techniques – so many rich contributions hidden and lost. Myriam’s work recovers and re-situates Hebrew text for us as a language of art.

After the inspiring lecture we toured the hall to view incredible paintings by both Myriam and her father.